Stacey LePage

In this, my 23rd year of teaching, I have found that I have begun tucking away my many experiences into the dark depths of my memory. My neighbour suggest that I record my experiences on this blog. Consequently, with four years left of teaching, I feel compelled to begin this new journey down memory lane on WordPress.

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26 Responses to Stacey LePage

  1. preachteach says:

    Wow! 23 years! Way to go! I left teaching after 6 to stay home with my kids (soon to be four). The transition was harder than I expected but writing has helped the creative bug stay alive! I too lost my father and have found sharing my feelings and experiences has been healing. Glad I found you!

    • inmycorner says:

      Thanks! I have enjoyed (almost) every day of it too — and time and experience have been wonderful teachers! I am looking forward to reading your blog in that we share “big” elements. Four children will keep you very busy – wondering when you have time to blog?? I have to get up very early even with only two children left. Good to have made your acquaintance!

  2. Cheryl says:

    Dearest Stacey, we’ve been thinking of you much all through the autumn and winter cheering you on, as our warrior princess. We are very much looking forward to our talk tomorrow.

    • inmycorner says:

      Not much of a warrior princess today – thanks – as I lay in my bed for the most of the day just ‘chilling”‘. IN any case – nice to know you are in my corner, too!

  3. Mary Kendall says:

    I taught for 34 years before I retired. It’s a wonderful profession. How nice to meet you, Stacey. 🙂

  4. GP Cox says:

    Pleased to meet you.

  5. Marc legros @ B says:

    Hi Stacky I don’t really know a lot about how blogs work new to online world but managed to find you wondering how you are,hope you are well. I will leave you my email mail address

  6. Hello! I would like to nominate you for an award.There are more details here https://ladameauxfleurs.wordpress.com/2015/12/23/the-versatile-blogger-award/

    On the other hand,I would like to tell you that you’re a really strong and talented women.I am sure things will get better because you definitely deserve it and God always takes care of people.Good luck 🙂

    • inmycorner says:

      Well – I’m honoured. Thank-you for that nomination. I will try to navigate my way through the process of accepting that award. And thank-you for those very kind words. THey come at a surprise to me – I do my best and whatever happens — happens. Thanks also for stopping by my blog!

  7. Tara Henderson says:

    Stacy, I stumbled on your post “You made a Difference” about my Dad. I was deeply moved by your thoughtful comments and shared them also with my Mom. I am coincidentally up in Collingwood with her for New Years. Thank you for giving me one of the best Christmas gifts I could have ever asked for. A day doesn’t go by that we don’t miss him. My Mom and I would be honored to meet you if you’re ever able to go for a coffee in Collingwood. Sincerely Tara and Carol

    • inmycorner says:

      Oh, my goodness! Tara – it is such an honour to receive this note from you. I am delighted that you found this post about your Dad – as you know – he was an inspiration to many and including me. I’m so very happy that you were able to share this with your Mum too! Your offer to meet you for coffee is very tempting – it is, in fact, an offer I cannot refuse. I’d be delighted. My email is: lepages@rogers.com if you’d like to arrange a time? All the best for the new year!

  8. Daniela says:

    I came over to ‘see’ you and wish you All the Best in New Year and Beyond -:)!

    Take Care!

  9. G. William says:

    Stacy, you are an inspiration to us all. I am becoming a stage 4 colorectal cancer survivor myself. I wish I had a 10th the energy you have. I do have my blog, colontosemicolon.com, so I know how important writing can be. I’m also starting a new “Bucket List Foundation” along with some doctors and travel specialists in Vancouver, so keeping busy. But I can’t seem to return to the physical life I had before surgery. How do you do it?

    George
    PS. Maybe your readers would be interested in supporting the foundation?
    https://www.gofundme.com/g3t3tdxu

    • inmycorner says:

      Oh, G. William – thank you for that. And congratulations on your battle! It is on-going, that’s for sure – but it sounds like you are doing what it takes to “live”! Bravo. I am only in first chemo of second treatment so it is early yet. By the end of the summer I’ll be more tired. BUT —- you do heal and regain energy slowly. Have patience. Good for you for your efforts. I will take a look at your website next week (when I’m finished the townhouse – grin). All the best – enjoy the day – be kind to yourself.

  10. G. William says:

    Thank you for the encouragmental. I’m on chemo treatment 6 today. Each round takes a little longer to recover from. I’ve avoided the painful arms by having a power port installed. It makes chemo treatment infinitely easier and pain free. Maybe ask your oncologist about it.

    • inmycorner says:

      I am scheduled for June! Yahoo. Bit of a back-log it seems. So, one more treatment before the port. Yeah – six treatments will do it to you. How many more?

    • inmycorner says:

      Sorry – just read your post – six more sucks – but it is doable! Going back to read your post more fully. (I soooo relate to chemo brain. I was so frustrated with not finding words that my code-word for not finding the word was “Super-chef”. Don’t ask why. But when I say that word – my family does not question. grin.

      • G. William says:

        My code word is Goddamfuckinchemo or some variation of the same..

        You will be so glad to have the port. Make sure they do the super port with the three raised bumps. The other one can’t be used for CT scan contrast and such. If they’going to install it you may as well get the best use of it.

        The needles they use to access it are bigger than the IV they use in your arm. So the initial poke is a bit painfull. Pick up a tube of numbing cream (lidocaine?) and smear it on an hour or so before.

        Mine used to be clotted up every time they tried to access it and they had to inject Altaplase to clear the clot before they could use it. It’s quite rare I’m told but I’ve always been special. Hahah. Seriously though, if it happens to you, INSIST that they consider testing you for a clotting problem. I ended up with serious pulmonary embolisms before they started me on blood thinners.

        I don’t mean to scare you. The port doesn’t cause the clots, the cancer does. You are going to love it.

      • inmycorner says:

        I appreciate your words of wisdom!

  11. Sally says:

    Stacey,
    Your words resonate so beautifully. You have the ability to find the positive in thr ‘hours’ of your day. Your searing honesty will help others. It can be so tiring to have a brave face all the time. Thank you for this.

    • inmycorner says:

      Thank-you so much, Sally. Indeed – it can be tiring – and a bit deceiving. Not sure wearing that smile all the time helps. I think it needs to come off every once in a while – but then BACK on!

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